NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

If you not change browser settings, you agree to it.

I understand
Slide item 1

The town hall was built between 1928 and 1932 by architect Ettore Sottsass, with its tower, corner balcony, the fresco work of Albert Stolz and the fountain

Photo: Municipality of Merano Archive

Slide item 2

Interior of the town hall today

Photo: Municipality of Merano Archive

Slide item 3

The Maia racecourse was built in 1935/1936 by architect Paolo Vietti Violi with a capacity of 15,000 people.

Photo: Municipality of Merano Archive

Slide item 4

The racecourse today.

Photo: Municipality of Merano Archive

Slide item 5

Historical photograph of the Casa del Fascio (previously Casa Littoria).

Photo: Municipality of Merano Archive

Slide item 6

Facade of the former Fascist party building, with horizontal bands in grey breccia and red bricks (1938).

Photo: Municipality of Merano Archive

Merano, Italy

South Tyrol

With the annexation to Italy and the coming to power of the Fascist Party, in Alto Adige, a massive operation of Italianisation began, which was not limited to language, administration or school. Even the architecture and urban planning of the major centres had to be of "Italian taste". Two were the stylistic strands of the fascist era that found application in the cities of South Tyrol: "rationalism" and "new objectivity". The two currents characterized the entire European scene in the 1920s. State architecture and propaganda also favoured a sort of monumental classicism in South Tyrol. The buildings built in Merano and Sinigo are valuable but less impressive and showy.

 

contentmap_module