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Tresignana, Italy

Planned town dedicated to agricultural industry

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Tirana, Albania

A mosaic of architectural styles

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Ferrara, Italy

Rationalist traces in a Renaissance city

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Carbonia, Italy

From mining town to living landscape museum

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Bertinoro, Italy

Thermal town between rationalism and Roman inspiration

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Castrocaro, Italy

Illusory beauty

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Cesenatico, Italy

Town of holiday camps

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Dimitrovgrad, Bulgaria

Between modernism and Stalinist architecture

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Forlì, Italy

Showcase of modernity – a story of contradictions

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Forlimpopoli, Italy

Urban regeneration

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Iași, Romania

Modern and ancient, side by side

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Labin, Croatia

Industrial mining town in transformation

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Predappio, Italy

From pilgrim destination to site of critical reflection

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Raša, Croatia

Between Istrian tradition and modern architecture

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Torviscosa, Italy

Town of autarchy and cellulose

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Ştei, Romania

Witness to a period of totalitarian post-war regimes

Former Villa Perelli

Cervia, Italy

The most original of Milano Marittima’s villas built during the Fascist period is Villa Perelli. Designed by the ingenious architect Mario Cavallè in 1940, it is said that Benito Mussolini during his numerous visits to the town was hosted there.

 An ocean liner in the pinewood

The villa is immersed in a majestic pinewood, creating a sensation of isolation. Thanks to the high and spacious veranda supported by five columns, it was possible to avoid eliminating some of the pine trees. At the same time, a suffocating effect of the dense vegetation was avoided. In fact, the villa almost seems to hover above the pine trees, enjoying a wide view of the sea horizon. Inspired by Italian futurism – thus by the myth of an interventionist political power – the veranda takes on the shape of the prow of an ocean liner supposed to “conquer new horizons”.

 Villa Perelli today

Later on, the villa became a hotel, then a residence (Residence Touring). For many years, it was the point of reference for the high society of Milano Marittima. Today, the building with its high columns and imposing rooms on top it remains a silent monument in a state of neglect, bearing witness to the expansion phase of Milano Marittima promoted by the Fascist regime’s tourism policy.